Tag Archives: Southwest Sara

Meandering Thru March Madness

Wildfire laps at the edge of Southwest Baptist Campground

The madness of the month of March has arrived!  My mother used to predict the weather for March 31 by what it was like on March 1. “In like a lion, out like a lamb; in like a lamb, out like a lion!”,  Mama would say every March 1.  According to my sources on the ground in Oklahoma – March 1 was a beautiful day this year. Here’s your advanced storm warning – be prepared on March 31!

The lion and lamb analogy can be aptly applied to other areas of March life.  Take for instance my nephew, Adam, and the love of his life, Mary.  Their first day of March roared in like a lion on the waves of labor pains.  The pains brought forth a precious little red haired princess, Virginia.  Something tells me that other than cries of hunger or wet diapers, their March 31 will ease out like a lamb for Princess Virginia, her sister Elinor and their parents.  I wish I could say that Virginia arrived in the land of red dirt but alas, she arrived in the bayou area of southeast Texas.  Someday when she is old enough to understand, her paternal grandmother, Clara, will entertain her with stories of the five generations of her family that equated red dirt with home.

Meandering around the madness of March memories of lions and lambs, several favorites have popped up to the top.  Youth retreats, spring revivals, and school breaks all bring to mind events that began like lambs but ended like roaring lions.  One of my favorite youth retreat destinations is nestled in the Quartz Mountains, across Highway 44 from Lake Altus.  The Southwest Baptist Assembly Grounds (SBAG) harbor many fond memories, including such firsts as my first week at church camp, embarrassment at my lack of knowledge of Donnie Osmond (he was the Justin Beiber of my day), first time as a camp counselor and numerous retreats as a teenager.

If ever there was a doubt that God can still use this place to His glory, one need only look at the lion of a wildfire of Summer 2011 that roared around the mountains surrounding the campground. The fire necessitated the evacuation of both SBAG and the Quartz Mountain Christian Camp located a mile north.  God protected both sites with His hands – one over each campground.  A tour of the area a few days afterward showed that the fires literally stopped at the edge of the campgrounds, within a few feet of some of the cabins.  God also protected the firefighters that day.  No serious injuries were reported as the fireproofed water bearers fought the flames while enduring temps in excess of 100◦F.

What does the lion and lamb analogy have in common with speeding tickets, sectional snow, “Hoosiers” and “Believe in Me”?  March Madness, of course!  Did you really think I could make it thru a blog titled “March Madness” without a mention of the basketball, that great orange orb that draws the attention of most of the nation for the month of March? Continue reading Meandering Thru March Madness

Well, For Pete’s Sake! ~ SW OK, Navajo and Navajoe


Well, for Pete’s sake! What are you doing here?  Let me guess, you Googled “red dirt road” hoping for a close encounter with Brooks & Dunn, but instead found yourself meandering down a narrow lane just off the information highway.  May I kindly suggest that you tune in your favorite music player to a round of Kix & Ronnie?  Crank it up and let it provide the background music for this little trip down a red dirt road in Jackson County, Oklahoma.

Southwestern Oklahoma is home to farmers and ranchers, air force pilots and army generals, city folks and country folks, the Quartz Mountains and the Wichita Mountains, lakes and rivers, and yes, four-lane divided highways and a few red dirt roads.  Nestled between the Quartz Mountains and Wichita Mountains are a lesser known range, the Navajo Mountains, located in eastern Jackson County, north of US 62 about 3 miles and east of Altus about 6 miles.

Seeking a good dose of red dirt therapy, I recently set out on a drive down the red dirt road that ends at the western base of the Navajo Mountains.  For Pete’s sake, I stopped at the Navajoe Cemetery.  My cousin Jacquie told me about the town of Navajoe, and my other cousin, Jackie, told me about the cemetery.  There is also the Navajo School, but I’ll save that for another story.  Both had mentioned the historical marker located in the cemetery that documents the town of Navajoe.  The vertical marker is made of red granite, similar to the that of the surrounding mountains.  Navajoe the town fell by the wayside years ago when the railroad went thru Headrick instead of Navajoe.  The cemetery and memories are all that remain of the town.

Before climbing out of the car that bright sunny morning, I surveyed the area surrounding the cemetery.  Continue reading Well, For Pete’s Sake! ~ SW OK, Navajo and Navajoe