Category Archives: Art

Includes all art forms: music, poetry, fine art, etc.

Silent Sundays: 9/26/10 – Images pulled from The Oklahoman, 9/25/1910, 100 years ago

CLICK ON IMAGE FOR LARGER VIEW

"Packing Town" (Stockyards) to open October 1, 1910 - CLICK ON IMAGE FOR LARGER VIEW, PARTIAL ARTICLE ONLY
Eat Your Grape Nuts! - CLICK ON IMAGE FOR LARGER VIEW

Demonstrations at the State Fair - "...Corsetry is a fine art"

Note: There were approximately 5-10 "tonics" for various ailments on sale through the newspaper. All "proven" and "not imitations like the others."

OSU v Tulsa Football Game Day Slide Show

Photos of OSU fans taken during Oklahoma State University football game day have been compiled into a RDC slide show for your enjoyment.  We even have one shot of a University of Tulsa couple dressed in their game day gear.   We hope to have a University of Oklahoma football game day presentation before the end of the season as well.  This past Saturday was, indeed, a good day in Stillwater.

Our “Relationships” entry will be released around noon today.  Enjoy!

CLICK PHOTO TO BEGIN SLIDE SHOW

Silent Sundays: 9/19/10

Innocent three year-old gives those behind him in the stands a chuckle before the OSU-Tulsa game begins Saturday night -Photo by Kelly Roberts, Red Dirt Chronicles.
Young OU fan shows the world his sibling position, his favorite football team and his patriotism all on one sign. (Photo retrieved from the Daily Oklahoman website - click photo to visit entire photo gallery).
One half mile from her driveway on 9-15-10, Red Dirt Kelly noticed the sunset in her rearview mirror coming home from work. Pulling over to the side of the road, she stopped and thanked the Big Sky for the 7:30 p.m. gift. - Photo by K. Roberts, Red Dirt Chronicles
Make sure and catch the State Fair before it closes. The remainder of the Silent Sunday photos were shot by Rylee Roberts in September, 2009 at the Oklahoma State Fairgrounds.
Photo by Rylee Roberts
Photo by Rylee Roberts
Photo by Rylee Roberts
9/18/10: Longhorn steers take a leisurely stroll along Independence Saturday during the annual Cherokee Strip Celebration parade in downtown Enid. (Staff Photo by BONNIE VCULEK) Click photo to visit the Enid news site.

Silent Sundays: Photos of the Week, 9/12/10

A tiny snapshot of the good done in Oklahoma for Oklahomans every day. Flatlander Car Club members, Roger Koehns and John Pugh, present a couple in need, Tia Hegwood and Alex Holguin, with a check for $500. The couple struggles with medical expenses due to Tia's diabetes. (Courtesy photo - provided to the Guymon Daily Herald.) Click photo to visit the newspaper for the article and link to the Car Club website.
Muslim men and boys pack the mosque of the Islamic Society of Tulsa during services Friday marking the end of Ramadan. MICHAEL WYKE/Tulsa World Read more from this Tulsa World article by clicking photo.
Oklahoma photographer Carl Zoch's self-documentary compilation of a recent trip he and his friends took to the mountains. Great shots & music. Click picture for the "Carl Was Here" slideshow.

Mrs. Tulsa America, Sasha Townsend and her partner Ryan McDaniel won "A Time to Dance", a local Dancing-With-The-Stars-style competition, to benefit the Hospitality House of Tulsa. Inserts on the photo are a shot of them rehearsing, and of their trophy. Click photo to visit the Hospitality House's website. Reprinted w/permission from Mrs. Townsend. Congratulations, Sasha!
Young girl led by her father on a miniature horse in the Sept. 4, 2010 Wilson Fall Festival Parade. Click picture to visit "The Ardmoreite" festival photos.
Oliver and Ina Stonecipher will be celebrating their 70th wedding anniversary in Stratford, OK on Sept. 19th. They were married in 1940 on the Pontatoc County line by Reverend Vard Wood. Click the picture to read the news announcement and see a photo of them on the day they were married in 1940 - linking you to the Ada Evening News.

Silent Sundays: Photos of the Week, 9/5/10

Two young boys play with toy farm equipment on the livestock barn floor, State Fair Week, 2009. The Oklahoma State Fair opens this year on Thursday, Sept. 16th. Click picture to view the 2009 State Fair photo gallery.
Ft. Cobb State Park - by Manual Focus Custom Photography
Double rainbow, captured by Carl Zoch - Oklahoma City, Sept. 2, 2010

Newlyweds gazing upon an Oklahoma sunset - by Carl Zoch. Click picture to travel to his gallery.
Oklahoma State University Students at the football season opener, Sept. 4, 2010. Click picture to travel to Daily Oklahoman game slideshow.
University of Oklahoma season football game opener - Broyles' end-zone dive, Spet. 4, 2010. Click picture to visit Daily Oklahoman photo slideshow.

RDC Photo of the Week

Next week we’ll begin our “Silent Sundays (see Weekly Schedule page).”  To help begin the feel for next week, here’s the first of our RDC Photos of the Week.

If you feel you have a photo that highlights the Red Dirt culture of middle America, showcases the State of Oklahoma in some way or puts a face to who we are, please submit your entries to:  reddirtchronicles@gmail.com

If you see your submission show up the following week, then that means you win!  What do you win? The smiles of our readers when they pull up the screen on Silent Sundays.  We are convinced there is no better reward.

Shouting out to the NY Times “20 Somethings” article this past week, our back-to-school season, our penchant for travel and the geographical region of Norman, OK – here is our first Photo of the Week.  Enjoy!

20-somethings Peggy White and Rachel Roberts enjoy a moment under a 1950s "Turbinator Hair Drier" during summer 2010 vacation in New York City. Peggy is a free-lance artist and Rachel is a Photography major at the University of Oklahoma.

Meanwhile, Back at the Ranch: He’s Home

Yesterday, I couldn’t wait to get home.  But as eager as I was to see my own home on a Friday afternoon, I was looking forward to an evening away from home on Saturday night…with someone who really knows how to appreciate coming home.

I met Bryan Hayes about five years ago.  I had just started teaching at the school where he worked as PE coach.  He did not appear to fit into the coach role.  He had long hair and looked like he really hadn’t done a push up in awhile.

As a couple of school years came and went, however, I learned more and more about my friend.  He could play the guitar and willingly brought it along with his mellow voice and beautiful wife to many late night functions.

He didn’t just play the guitar.  He had a BAND:  Bryan Hayes and the Retrievers… not so odd of a name when you know that Bryan is an animal advocate.  He has a home full of rescued Labs of all shapes and sizes.

One day Bryan came to school without the rest of his hair.  I thought that maybe he had gotten into trouble somehow, but nothing could have been further from the truth.  Bryan had joined the Army National Guard.  This spring while most of us were living somewhat normal lives, Bryan was in Iraq.  This son, husband, uncle, friend, singer, and teacher was busy making sure we had a safe place to call home.

Tonight Bryan and his band stood on a stage and humbly entertained friends and family.  Wait. No.  He entertained family. Bryan Hayes, our brother, is home.

(Click the picture to watch Bryan and the Retrievers play “Lonesome Soldier.”)

Bryan and the Retrievers playing "Lonesome Soldier"

Day 33: God Created my DNA and He Reminded Me of the Code in St. Mary’s Cathedral

As a young girl, my parents prepared my brother and I to seek an expansion of perspective beyond that which our own community had to offer.  Comprised within this family plan were experiences of art, travel and educational enrichment.  The mode of delivery usually meant we were loaded into the farm truck and driven to some event in Oklahoma City…despite any resistance on our part.

These “field trips” might have included a classical concert or perhaps a lecture from an archeologist who had discovered pitch clad shards of gopher wood on a limited time-window excursion in Turkey.  Sometimes, the evenings were capped off with an ice cream cone at Kaiser’s in the heart of downtown.  At the time, I’m sure the ice cream was my favorite part.  I do recall, however, feeling the hair on my arms lift as I touched the Lucite bound tiny pieces of what I thought might be Noah’s Ark.

My K-12 formal educational journey was also important in how I began to view the world.  I learned of fairness and the magic of discovery from the effective teachers, and of injustice and constriction from those less able.  The good must have outweighed the challenging, however, because every cell in my body seeks new understandings to this day.  It’s in my DNA, and God reminded me of this by giving me a gift on Day 33 that I’ll never forget.

This past Sunday I attended The University Church of St. Mary the Virgin. Expectations had already been set on my part simply knowing that C.S. Lewis had preached his “Weight of Glory” sermon in that very hall.  John Wesley spoke there on many occasions, and before the College system sprang up in Oxford, the church served as the location for the educational exercises such as group lectures or exams.  This was at a time in the 13th century when scholars actually lived with the professors to receive their education.  This church is central to how the entire educational context was set throughout Oxfordshire.

Eucharist began at 10:30 and I came in the door at 10:32.  I was handed a Hymn book and a guide to the service, was shown an available seat and sent on my way.  Being an evangelical, I’ve learned to watch the other attendees and the pastor carefully when participating in a service such as that offered at St. Mary’s.  There is standing, sitting, standing…and sitting.  And standing.  There is also a participatory portion that the audience reads by following the service guide.  All these machinations are unfamiliar to me, but easy to follow.  I’m glad, because it left much of my mental energy available to absorb everything else. Comments continued after the photograph…

I’ll not provide the entire sermon, nor all my thoughts during the service.  Indeed, some were too personal, too humbling, too set on the holiness of our Lord.  However I will share a bit of that for which I am grateful:

1.  I’m grateful for the chance to have heard the message delivered by the Reverend Canon Brian Mountford, Vicar of the University Church.  From the moment he began to speak, my rapt attention zeroed in on his outline and it was one of the best sermons I’ve heard in my life.  Scripture, poetry, philosophy, education, human suffering and regard – all these concepts and perhaps more were laid before those attending and asked to be considered on behalf of our Creator.

2.  I’m grateful for a greeting time wherein the only task was to reach out to those around us and utter this simple phrase, “Peace to you,” or respond, “And to you as well.”  This made me cry – the simplistic form of a gentle greeting and a gentle return. Wonderful.

3.  I’m grateful for a communion service where each person was reminded with one phrase, “The body of Christ,” that which they were taking as they were handed a piece of bread.  And I’m grateful to have been given the chance to drink from a community cup real wine, the edge of which was wiped with a cloth and given the person next in line.  I’ve never shared a cup with others, and it is a compelling experience.

4.  I’m grateful to have had the chance to sing all verses of the selected Hymns, generally written in Old English verse, accompanied by an organ whose song filled the highest corners of the cathedral.  I know the notes lifted up our voices and sent them to the Heavens.

5.  And, I’m grateful for the reminding affirmations for all who participated, each time we read along during the service. An example: “We are the body of Christ.  In the one Spirit we were all baptized into one body.  Let us then pursue all that makes for peace and builds up our common life.”  Another: “Great is the Mystery of Faith – Christ has died. Christ is risen. Christ will come again.  Blessing and honor and glory and power be yours for ever and ever. Amen.”

With every affirmation stated by the audience, my faith was affirmed and deemed a righteous pursuit.

I don’t know if I’ll get to attend a service at St. Mary’s again.  However, for me, it was as if my spirituality had attended an inspirational conference – – a conferring or communion with God.  A renewal was given to me and for that I am grateful as well.

I’ll leave you with a poem that was read during the sermon.  The discussion was about how one person might say a leaf is green due to the chlorophyll, another because the evolutionary sea life was purple – so green was refracted, and another – a poet – might say “because it means renewal.”

Peace to you.

~~~~~~~

The Trees

The trees are coming into leaf
Like something almost being said;
The recent buds relax and spread,
Their greenness is a kind of grief.

Is it that they are born again
And we grow old? No, they die too.
Their yearly trick of looking new
Is written down in rings of grain.

Yet still the unresting castles thresh
In fullgrown thickness every May.
Last year is dead, they seem to say,
Begin afresh, afresh, afresh.

Philip Larkin